What Gets Me Angry

I suppose everyone has their unique anger button. I don’t have many, but here’s what gets my goat: Opportunity Loss. I believe this is worth getting angry over. Individuals, committees, regulations, etc. – if they cost opportunity, they cost vision. [Tweet this.]

What Makes Me Angry

I’ve been accused for being a visionary. I’m not sure if that’s a bad thing, but if you’re a visionary, you’ll get what I’m saying here. I tend to see ahead, down the road, beyond what most people see. I…

The bigger the project, the more details that need to come together, and the more people need to understand and be adaptable. These take time and effort, lots of conversation and thinking and work.

Visionary work is good work, but also hard work.

But sometimes, some yahoo throws a grenade in the middle of the venture to the goal. It could be as subtle as gossip, a refusal to get a key project done, or a nasty blow up. Perhaps the person feels justified, offended, righteous or whatever, but seldom does he or she see what I see: a dissipating vision. Lost opportunity. I see…

  • …profits out the window.
  • …hundreds or thousands unserved.
  • …people’s lives untouched.

It’s disappointment. The opportunity is lost. It’s not right. And that gets me angry.

Question: Do you know what movie the picture above is from?

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  • RickStevens

    Hate to give it away up front because I absolutely love the movie. I’ll just say that the picture is one of twelve.

    I am absolutely with you on being angry with lost opportunity, but I will qualify that a little bit. My anger at lost opportunity comes generally when I see it as having been wasted. When someone tells another person that they can’t do (fill in the blank), it angers me. When talent is not pursued and worked to its fullest potential, it angers me. When excellence that should be celebrated is overlooked (oftentimes because the person who could promote the celebration won’t be recognized), it angers me. Too often, I see our “civilization” so interested in a “me-centric” outcome that true innovators, those who are both willing and able to bring about amazing changes, are stifled. I didn’t initially intend to go this direction, but I will bring it back to the election results from last November. There were two candidates. One was seen as a friend of business who had a plan for turning the collective economic machine back into the upright position. The other was seen as a friend who likes to give out free things to people. The me-centric populous voted for themselves, individually, not the country as a collective whole. When the decision to sacrifice the opportunity for advancement simply because it doesn’t fit with the “me-centric” world in which most of us grew up indoctrinated into (yes, that is a cheap-shot at the feel-good, ego-stroking, self-esteem machine that is public education), then that opportunity is dismissed. Missing out on an opportunity because it wasn’t recognized is one thing. Leaving it by the wayside because of a refusal to recognize is another. That one is the one that gets me angry.

    • One of my favorite movies, too! Good point on the me-centricness of the problem. Funny, the conflicts I’ve had have shown a dysfunctional form of jealousy from them. They get annoyed when others prosper or come up with great ideas. It’s weird.